Events: Teach abroad panel–Global Fellowships

Wednesday, June 20 at 5pm in MGH 171, 6 UW alums will be sharing their experiences applying for teaching fellowships and teaching English abroad.  This is a great opportunity for students considering applying to the Fulbright program, TAPIF, Cultural Ambassadors or other programs to learn more about the process from recent alums.  All are welcome!

Global Fellowships Teaching Assistant Panel
June 20 | 5:00 p.m. | Mary Gates Hall 171
Join us at 5pm for refreshments and conversation. We’ll start the panel at 5:30pm. Come with your questions!
Panelists include recently awarded teaching assistants, returning students and program representatives.
Let us know you plan to attend.

Volunteer: ALISS Spring Book Sale–Volunteers needed!

ALISSBookSale

This Thursday and Friday is the ALISS Spring Book Sale! We are so excited for this event, but in order for it to be as successful as possible we could use some of your help!

We will be on Red Square from 10am-4pm, with set up beginning at 9:30am. All MLIS students are invited to help with this fundraising event. Volunteers can help with set up, making change, and/or tearing down. Sign up for an hour shift here: http://signup.com/go/bVQERzm

If you are unable to volunteer, we would still love to see you! Stop by and buy and book or two to support ALISS.

Funding: NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program info sessions

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National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRFP) Information Sessions

RSVP to attend (though drop-ins are welcome)

  • Thursday, May 24, 2018, 4:30-6pm, MGH 171
  • Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 12:30-2pm, MGH 171

NSF GRFP is one of the premier opportunities to fund graduate study.  It provides 3 years of funding that you can use in a 5 year time frame.  This includes a $34,000 annual stipend and full cost of tuition/fees covered. For UW graduate students, GAIP health insurance is also covered. Continue reading

Career Newsletter, 5/18/18

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Summer Career Activities

The end of the year is just around the corner. Career Services would like to extend our congratulations to those of you graduating. As you begin your career, or take whatever other step is next, we encourage you to stay in touch. Dean (and soon, our new career advisor) is able to meet with alumni for advising appointments up to one quarter after graduation — that’s through August for those of you finishing in June — while the UW Career & Internship Center takes appointments up to two years after graduation.

Once you’ve settled in at your new organization, please also feel free to reach out about hosting a recruitment event at the iSchool. As you may have experienced from your time here, information sessions and iLounge hangouts that feature iSchool alumni are particularly helpful to our current students, and they can help Career Services in strengthening our relationships with industry partners. This year, we collaborated on recruitment events with alumni from companies including Fast Enterprises, Avanade, West Monroe Partners, AT&T, Liberty Mutual, and BlackRock.

For those of your returning in the fall, below we’ve outlined some career-related things you do this summer — either in place of or in addition to an internship — to help ensure that once you graduate, you step into a career you find engaging and fulfilling. The newsletter is largely a compilation of disparate topics we’ve covered in more depth throughout the year.

Determine your values.

Finding a company at which you’re inspired to grow is difficult if you don’t know what you hold personally valuable. Is your main career goal maximizing income? Or are you more concerned with finding a company focused on social good? Determining the answer to questions like these is immensely important in the job search — if you are someone who prioritizes social good, for example, you can imagine the angst you might feel at a company that ignored such concerns in the name of increased profits.

More on this topic here. Continue reading

Notice: Scam Warnings Sent to International Students

Criminals Stealing Money from International Students by Phone

Be careful if you receive a call from someone who claims to be from the U.S. government or the police and demands money. These calls are fake, and are from criminals. They want to scare you and steal your money!

  • Do not give payment information by phone to someone calling you with threats: credit card numbers, online account transfer information, or other personal financial information!
  • Do not buy gift cards to pay someone calling or emailing you with threats!
  • Do not give personal info to someone calling or emailing with threats: copies of your immigration documents, UW account info and password, social media info, etc.
  • Do not agree to meet an unknown caller at a strange address (parking lot, grocery store, etc.)

Continue reading

Career Newsletter, 5/10/18

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Career (and Life) Reading

Summer is a great time to start a job or work an internship. Summer is a great time to do something other than work a job or internship. Summer is also a great time to read.

This week, we’ve compiled reading material that covers both topics are that are explicitly career-related and those just generally relevant to recent and soon-to-be grads. The first part features a book recommendation from both Career Services members, followed by a list of online outlets putting out useful content.

Career Services’ favorite books

Dean’s choice: First Job First Paycheck: how to get the most out of both…without help from your parents by Jeff Lehman

Jeff Lehman is the Founder and CEO of his own holding company, and sits on the Board of Advisors for the Foster School’s Professional Sales Program. His book focuses on personal finances and navigating the professional landscape, with an eye toward recent graduates.

From Dean:

First Job First Paycheck is a good read for young professionals that covers everything from getting your first job or internship, to managing money and making smart financial decisions. The first sections of the book cover general information on job searching, networking, and setting goals, which is most applicable to current juniors, seniors, and first-year master’s students.

I found the most value in section three, which gives practical examples on money management. Author Jeff Lehman discusses the importance of your FICO score and building credit, saving for retirement via 401(k) and Roth IRAs (and other options), and gives example budgets and suggestions on how to create them. He also makes practical suggestions on how to protect your assets, such as using renters insurance, which can be as cheap as $10/month but protect you from the cost of replacing your personal property due to theft, fire, vandalism, or flooding.

While one of the chapters in the section (“20 ways real life can impact your financial life”) covers some obvious decisions to avoid, such as drinking or texting while driving, Lehman also brings light to common financial mishaps people make when they are shopping for engagement rings, homes and mortgages, and having kids. Continue reading