Professional Development Series: Success for Graduate Students and Postdocs

The Graduate School offers events and presentations throughout the year that are designed to help graduate students at all phases of their education be successful. The fall 2001 line-up is listed below. A few of the presentations are being offered more than once, feel free to come to as many presentations as you’d like.  (More presentations will be added, please watch for these announcements every week.) You can also check the Graduate School website at www.grad.washington.edu

All presentations will be held in the Research Commons (ground floor of the Allen Library, unless otherwise noted)

“Communicating and Collaborating with your Research Advisor”
Sept 22nd 1-2 Paccar Hall 295

As a graduate student or postdoc one of the most important relationships you have is with your research advisor (sometimes referred to as your research supervisor, or dissertation or thesis chair). In this interactive presentation we will go over some key skills to have and develop that can help make that central relationship work well and be mutually successful. Please join us for this popular presentation. Our presenter is Rebecca Aanerud, Associate Dean in the Graduate School.

“Funding your Graduate Education”*
Oct 3rd from 4:30-5:20; Oct 4th from 1:30-2:20

There is no question that the funding of higher education, particularly at the graduate level, is an ongoing challenge for most students.  However, there are strategies you can learn and employ to increase your funding resources. In this workshop you will learn some of the basic categories of funding and learn how to identify and search for potential funding sources.  Also, the earlier you get started the better. This presentation is idea for new graduate students as well as students midway through their studies. It is also excellent for advanced undergraduates or anyone considering applying to graduate school in the future. Our presenter is Graduate Funding Information Manager, Julie Tanaka.

“Funding your PhD”*
Oct 4th from 4:30-5:20

Description forthcoming from presenter Julie Tanaka, Graduate Funding Information Manager

“Choosing a Citation Management System that is Right for You”*
Oct 5th from 11:30-12:30; Oct 11th from 11:30-12:30; Oct 19th from 3:00-4:00

Yes, you can still use note cards. However, keeping track of what you read, view, download, as you conduct your research is easier and more versatile than ever. Citation management systems offer an efficiency, flexibility, and organization.  In this presentation, you will learn about three of the major Citation management systems, Refworks, Endnotes, and Zotero. While all three provide similar functionality, they vary in certain ways and some are more conducive to certain kinds of research. Feel free to bring your laptop. If you don’t already have Mozilla Foxfire on your laptop, you might want to add it for accessing Zotero.

Our presenters include Deb Raftus, Romance Languages & Literatures Librarian, Kathleen Collins, Sociology Librarian, Deepa Banerjee,  South Asian Studies Librarian, Linda DiBiase, Collection Development Librarian, and Terry Ann Jankowski, Head of the Information & Education Services, Health Sciences Library.

“Utilizing the Research Commons as a Graduate Student”*
Oct 6th from 11:00-11:30; Oct 11th from 11:00-11:30; Oct 26th from 2:00-2:30

The goal of the  Research Commons is to encourage and facilitate collaborative and innovative research activities for students and faculty.  The space is intentionally flexible and dynamic from its décor to its technology. Find out more about the Research Commons and how to use it for your own research needs. Our presenter is Lauren Ray, Research Commons
Librarian.

“The Literature Review”
Oct 10th from 12-1

Most graduate students at some point in their work will need to prepare a literature review.  From seminar paper to MA thesis to dissertation, the literature review provides both the foundation and the frame for your research. Its preparation requires carefully planning and a well-crafted presentation. This professional development presentation walks you through the various steps of initiating and completing a strong and purposeful literature review.  This presentation is perfect for new and advanced graduate students. Our presenter is Communications Professor, Nancy Rivenburgh.

“Managing Your Research Bibliographies with Zotero”*
Oct 12th from 3-4; Nov 3rd from 2-3

Zotero is one of the major citation management systems used by academics. Citation management systems bring organization and simplicity to organizing and keeping track of your research citations and your bibliography. In this presentation you will learn details about how to make Zotero work for you. Bring your laptop and research topics.  If you don’t already have Mozilla Foxfire on your laptop, you might want to add it for accessing Zotero. Our presenter includes Deb Raftus, Romance Languages & Literatures Librarian and Linda Whang, Engineering Instructional Services Librarian

“Managing Your Research Bibliographies with Refworks”*
Oct 13th from 1-2

Refworks is one of the major Citation Management Systems used by academics. Citation Management Systems bring organization and simplicity to organizing and keeping track of your research citations and your bibliography. In this presentation you will learn details about how to make Refworks work for you. Bring your laptop and research topics. Our presenter is Kathleen Collins, Sociology Librarian.

“Managing Your Research and Bibliographies with Endnote”*
Oct 13th from 1-2; Nov 9th from 1:30-2:30

EndNote is one of the major Citation Management Systems used by academics. Citation management systems bring organization and simplicity to organizing, managing, and sharing your research citations.  It will also help you format your in-text citations and reference list in a Word document.  In this presentation you will learn details about how to make Endnote work for you. Bring your laptop if you have EndNote already installed on it or sit back and watch the demonstration. Our presenters are Joanne Rich and Amy Harper, Health Sciences Librarians.

“Utilizing the Special Collections in Research”*
Oct 20th from 11:30-12:20; Oct 26th from 3:30-4:20

The Special Collections Division is the Libraries’ major resource for rare and archival materials covering a broad range of topics, formats, and periods. Research strengths include the history of the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Western Canada; architecture; book arts; 19th century American literature; photography; and historical children’s literature. Researchers from fields as diverse as public health, art, engineering, literature, social work, political science (to name but a few), have drawn from the materials. This presentation introduces you to the collection and helps you think about how your research might be able to take advantage of this special collection, typically, unavailable at other libraries. Our presenter is Blynne Olivieri, Special Collections Librarian. Held in the Special Collection Library (Basement of Allen Library South).

“Using Citation Tracking and Cited Reference Searching to Discover Who is Citing Whom”*
Oct 25th from 1-2

Found the perfect reference but it is 10 years old? Come see how to use cited reference searching to find current and relevant materials. Our presenter is led by Terry Ann Jankowski, Head of the Information & Education Services, Health Sciences Library.

“Research Tips and Techniques for your Literature Review for the Physical Sciences and Engineering”*
Oct 27th from 2-3

Research Tips and Techniques for your Literature Review is designed to save you time and enhance the sophistication of your research by introducing you, or reintroducing you, to databases and research techniques. This particular presentation is geared towards graduate students engaged in Physical Sciences and Engineering research that draws on methodologies and
theoretical approaches of those disciplines. However, it is open to all graduate students at any level. Our presenter is Head Engineering Librarian, Mel DeSart. This workshop will be held in Red A.

“A Dozen Sentences That Should Appear in your (Academic) Job Application Letter”
Nov 1st from 12 noon-1

When you apply for an academic job, your cover letter is your opportunity to help a hiring committee interpret your curriculum vitae.  More important, the letter is your opportunity to excite them about your work in a way that isn’t possible with a dry curriculum vitae. Join us for this interactive presentation that helps you think about the key points you want to cover in your letter. Please bring any job announcements you are responding to, or send by email to raan@uw.edu in advance of the session. Our Presenter is Professor Philip Howard.

“Developing a Teaching Statement”
Date TBD

Increasingly, teaching statements are requested as part of the job application materials for all academic faculty positions. This presentation helps you develop your teaching statement, even if you haven’t had a lot of teachings experience as a graduate student or postdoc. You will learn to identify how your experiences as a mentor, lab leader, grader, section
leader, or even teaching not in the academic setting can serve as evidence of your ability to be an excellent teacher.  Our presenter is Karen Freisem, Senior Consultant at the Center for Teaching and Learning.

“From Dissertation to Article: Publishing Your Work”*
Nov 15th from 1:30-2:30

Description forthcoming from presenter Thom Deardorff.

“What Are Your Peers Writing?: Using The Dissertation Abstracts Database”
Nov 17th from 11:30-Noon

The Dissertation Abstracts Database is a fantastic and under-utilized resource. In this presentation we will introduce you to the wealth of information in this database. Not only will you be able to determine what your peers are writing about, so as to help you select your own unique topic, but, you will also be able to see what resources they used. Dissertation bibliographies are a wonderful way to help build your own literature review. Our presenter will be presented by Theresa Murdrock, History Librarian.

*In partnership with the UW libraries

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