Student Orgs: UW High Performance Computing Club resources

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The High Performance Computing Club (HPCC) at the University of Washington is dedicated to helping students get free access to computing resources. There are three main avenues in which we facilitate this:

  1. On-Campus Resources – HPCC has purchases several hundred thousand dollars worth of computing equipment on behalf of all students. These compute nodes are part of the university wide compute cluster call Hyak. We train students on the basics of how to use this system, and grant access to our allocation of the cluster.
  2. Cloud Resources – HPCC is also the steward of a substantial grant of funding cloud computing projects. If you are interested in using the major cloud providers in your research, we have quarterly grant cycles to provide funding for these projects. Our current cycle is open, please visit (http://students.wa shington.edu/hpcc/cloud-credits/)
  3. Mentorship Program – We have a quarterly mentorship program which pairs graduate students with undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing computational research. (http://students.washington.edu/hpcc/mentorship-program/)

More information about to get access to these great resources is available on our website. (http://students.washington.edu/hpcc/)

Career Newsletter, 2/22/2018

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Job Search for International Students

Job searching is difficult no matter your connections or credentials. International students, though, face a unique set of obstacles that can further complicate things: confusion over work authorization, employers hesitant to do extra paperwork, concerns about non-native English-speaking abilities, and so on. These certainly aren’t always fair, but it’s important that international job seekers anticipate the challenges and prepare accordingly.

Challenge: The (assumed) complexity and resulting confusion of hiring international students

Many employers lack experience with hiring international applicants and, as a result, make incorrect assumptions — that the process is too time consuming, costly, etc. To counteract this, we recommend becoming informal experts on work visas. Attend F-1, Optional Practice Training (OPT), and Curricular Practice Training (CPT) workshops put on by UW International Student Services (SUDO is also hosting a CPT info session with an ISS adviser this upcoming Monday). You may also want to research the H-1B visa program. Practice explaining these topics in just a few sentences.

Here’s how you might approach the subject at a networking event (it probably fits most naturally after you’ve given your elevator pitch):

“Does your company hire international applicants on student visas?”

Or:

“Are you familiar with hiring students for CPT or OPT? I’m an international student interested in applying for a position with your company.” Continue reading

Funding: Apply by Feb 20 for the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge

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Form a team. Shape the future. Maybe the idea came to you in a class, lab, studio, or on a hike. Whatever the source, the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge student competition is the place to use your skills to create innovative solutions to our pressing environmental problems. Bring your idea or capstone project to life!

Apply Here: https://app.reviewr.com/s1/site/eic18
Deadline: February 20

The top 21 teams from the Screening Round advance to the Challenge on March 29, at Seattle Center Exhibition Hall.

Additional Resources and Opportunities to Support Your Team

Examples of Past Entries
So you want to enter, but you feel like the business part is intimidating—We can help! All students are invited to come by our office in Dempsey Hall 227 to view past entries. Bring a notepad and any questions you might have. And definitely review the rules beforehand under the “Entry Requirements” tab. There are also a few examples on the EIC website under the “Judging Criteria” tab.

2017 EIC Photo Diary
What is the competition experience like? Take a look at the photo diary from the 2017 EIC and read what students just like you had to say.

Drop-in or Stream Resource Nights
Attend, live-stream, or watch the recording of Resource Nights, covering various aspects of creating a startup venture, from idea generation to legal issues to raising capital. The classes are recorded and streamed live each Tuesday night starting at 6:00 pm during winter quarter.

MentorConnect
A virtual platform where you can connect with professionals who are happy to advise you. Use your UW student ID.

Questions?  Email Lauren Brohawn at brohal@uw.edu.

Career Newsletter, 2/15/2018

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Interviewing Your Interviewer

The sense of nervous anticipation that precedes an interview is almost inevitable. You’re worried about making a good impression and that’s okay. That said, it’s important to see interviews not simply as candidate evaluations, but back-and-forth assessments between interviewer and interviewee. While the organization is using the meeting to judge your unique set of skills, experience, and personality, it’s also a chance to see how well they fit you.

Most interviews will end with the employer asking if you have any questions of them. Taking full advantage of this opportunity will help ensure you don’t jump into a job you end up dreading. You can ask for general information about company culture and the day-to-day, along with more detailed stuff like team structure and vacation, and anything in between. Below are tips on succeeding in this role reversal.

Prepare questions before you go.

Coming up with questions in advance will not only demonstrate your preparedness come interview time, it’ll give you time to develop ones that actually provide pertinent info. Think about what aspects of the job might impact your decision to accept or decline an offer and jot down questions accordingly. What’s the minimum amount of paid time off you’d take? Do you want a hands-off managerial philosophy, or something more structured? You don’t want to pose these as demands, but do try to get a sense of whether or not the company can meet your needs. Continue reading

Events: iSchool Research Fair 2-22-18

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The Information School at the University of Washington
invites you to attend the

iSchool Research Fair
Thursday, February 22, 2018
6:30 – 8:00 p.m.
Husky Union Building (HUB) South Ballroom

The Research Fair is our annual event for sharing and celebrating the work of our vibrant research community. This year we will welcome our new dean, Anind Dey, and present the largest showcase of iSchool research to date. Drinks and light fare will be provided.

Come explore how our faculty, research personnel, and Ph.D. students are pushing boundaries, responding to significant real-world challenges, and making a difference in the lives of individuals and communities. Our researchers will display and discuss over 70 posters and interactive demonstrations covering a wide range of information topics and problems.

The event is free. RSVPs are greatly appreciated.

Click here to email your RSVP jrphipps@uw.edu.

Events: Native American Student Day 2018 (Call for Proposals)

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Native American Student Day is March 29, 2018 (Thursday).  An important part of the day are the UW Experience workshops.  These are experiential learning workshops offered by UW departments and campus programs.  Students will choose two 45-minute workshops.

We invite you to be a part of this UW Experience by offering workshops that are engaging and highlight potential majors and career paths.  The workshops will take place at a location of your choosing.  Students will be escorted to and from the Intellectual House to your workshop.  All you have to do is provide the space and program.  This will allow students to see UW at a deeper level than the student tour.  Continue reading